Organic pie firm expands

first_imgOrganic pasty and pie specialist Jones Organic has announced plans to expand its production facilities, with the addition of a new site, to cope with increased demand from specialist retailers in London and south-east England.The firm, based in Bridgend, began distributing its pies through Stratford Fine Foods in September, and now has orders coming in from London-based speciality retailers, including Planet Organic and As Nature Intended.It signed the lease for a neighbouring 750sq ft factory unit, in October. “We’ve been really tight for space in the bakery to meet orders recently,” explained founder and MD Mike Sweetman.“Both our Organic Bake-Off range and our Baked Chilled range are selling very well – we’ve had no choice but to extend our bakery to cope.”The office and storage has been moved from its existing 1,500sq ft site, releasing space in the existing unit for: the doubling of its goods-out freezer capacity to house bake-off lines; the doubling of its baking capacity with a new rack oven for baked-chilled lines; and a new packing area, explained Sweetman.The work is due to be completed by the end of November this year. Jones Organic’s pies are available throughout the UK, frozen-unbaked from Stratford Fine Foods, Bako Western or Bako Wales, or baked-chilled directly from the bakery.last_img read more

MLB playoffs 2019: Tommy Edman’s arrival as surprising star helped Cardinals make October return

first_imgST. LOUIS — As reporters, we ask a lot of questions about a lot of topics. Often, we’ll ask about other players, for notebook items or feature stories, and you can generally tell by the answer and body language whether the player/coach is genuinely impressed with the player we’re asking about, or whether they’re just saying nice things for the sake of nice things.Sometimes, though, the people we’re interviewing will bring up players out of the blue or because the question is just tangentially related. That’s how you know they’re really impressed.  NLDS: Braves confident, not concerned with 18-year postseason droughtAnd that’s exactly what happened a couple of times before and after the penultimate game of the regular season in St. Louis. Before the contest, soon-to-be-ex-Cubs manager Joe Maddon was asked how he, back in April, knew the NL Central race would come down to the Cardinals, Cubs and Brewers. First, he gave a typical Maddon-ism answer. “You look at the other teams and you’ve just got to be honest. Everybody thinks their baby is the cutest, you know, but the other kids are cute, too. When you look at it with your eyes open, you can see they’re pretty good.”And then he brought up Tommy Edman, pretty much out of the blue. “The big difference on this team, for me, is Edman,” Maddon said. “That’s the difference-maker right now. That’s the kid, and I know it’s hard to say that about a first-year guy, but when we play them now compared to when we played them earlier this year, he makes a marked difference for this team.” Maddon’s Cubs won that game, chasing veteran Cardinals starter Adam Wainwright in the fifth inning of what wound up as an 8-6 loss for the home team, ensuring that the season’s final contest would be very meaningful. After the game, Wainwright was asked about the disappointment of giving up a dozen hits and a half-dozen runs in his outing, and he spoke openly about the frustration. He was then asked about the young players on the team experiencing the postseason-type atmosphere for the first time — remember, the Cardinals had missed October three years in a row — and Wainwright immediately brought up Edman. “Seeing what Tommy Edman did today on the biggest stage, against the biggest rival we have, in the biggest spot of our whole season, and him cool as a cucumber out there, taking great at-bats, working counts and taking two-strike breaking balls to left-center,” Wainwright said. “I mean, you can’t say enough about what he and some of the other young fellas are doing.”The at-bat the veteran referenced happened in the fifth inning, with the Cardinals trailing 6-1. Edman came up with two on and one out. Maddon brought in reliever David Phelps to move Edman, a switch-hitter, to the left side of the plate. For the year, Edman’s OPS was 154 points lower from that side, though at .810 still wasn’t shabby.Edman smacked a triple to the wall in left-center on a 2-2 pitch, slicing the Cubs’ lead from five runs to a much more manageable three runs. It was his seventh triple on the season. MORE: NLDS preview, predictionsIf you’re looking for a turning point in the Cardinals’ season, it’s easy to point to Edman’s arrival. The sixth-round pick in 2016 out of Stanford started the 2019 season with Triple-A Memphis, rolling up a .305 average, .869 OPS, seven homers and nine stolen bases in 49 games before making his debut on June 8. He started only one of his first 11 big league games, hitting an even .400 in those contests, and moved into the starting lineup by the beginning of July. The Cardinals entered that month with a 41-41 record and in third place in the NL Central, barely ahead of the Pirates.You remember what happened starting in July, right? The Cardinals went 16-9 that month, then 18-9 in August and 16-12 in September, a three-month stretch of baseball played at a .625 winning percentage that led them to the NL Central title. The Cardinals, on the year, were 47-28 in games he started and 44-43 in games he didn’t start.Edman was right there in the middle of everything. In his 92 games, the 5-10, 180-pounder batted .304 with an .850 OPS, 17 doubles, 11 homers, seven triples, 15 stolen bases and a 3.8 bWAR. And he played all over the field, too: 41 starts at third base, 23 at second base and 11 in right field — even though he never played a single game in the outfield in the minor leagues. Here’s a bit of perspective: That 3.8 bWAR Edman produced in 92 games was higher than numbers posted by Kris Bryant (3.6 in 147 games), Justin Turner (3.7 in 135 games), Manny Machado (3.1 in 156 games), Lorenzo Cain (2.8 in 148 games) and even heralded teammate Paul Goldschmidt (2.8 in 161 games). And though Edman might not be known on a national scale like those other names, you can be sure the Cardinals appreciate him. “I think he’s a superstar,” Wainwright said. “I’m glad we have him on our team.” And you can also be sure the Braves — the Cardinals’ opponent in the NLDS, starting tonight — are well aware of him, too.last_img read more

Provencio’s defense calls 1 witness; jury expected to hear closing statements early Tuesday

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — It took the State of Kansas five days of testimony to wrap up its case against Sylvester Provencio, charged with aggravated battery, a level 5 felony.It took the defense less than five minutes.After Sumner County Attorney Kerwin Spencer closed his case Monday afternoon, Provencio’s defense attorney Jess Hoeme called on Sumner County Detective Keith Bristor to the stand. He asked if there was any blood samples taken at the scene of the alleged crime.Bristor said there was not.Bristor said he took over for Jeff Hawkins as the Sumner County Sheriff Detective in 2015. The April 22, 2015 brawl in southern Sumner County was one of the last cases that Hawkins investigated. Bristor said he knew of no blood evidence that was submitted or documented to a state forensic crime lab.Provencio then declined to testify in his behalf. Hoeme then rested his case.Sumner County District Judge Scott McQuin then excused the jury for the day, and told them to reconvene on 9 a.m. Tuesday where both County Attorney Kerwin Spencer and Hoeme will present their closing arguments. The 12-person jury is then expected to start deliberation thereafter.Shortly after the state rested this afternoon, Hoeme asked the judge to dismiss the aggravated battery charge because there was not enough sufficient evidence that Provencio used force against Greg Schneider, 53, of Caldwell, who sustained significant injuries during the melee.Hoeme said the melee involving four Caldwell men, five miles east of Caldwell, which started over a truck being stuck. There was essentially two fights going at the same time, Hoeme said – one between Provencio and Brian Nispel while Reedy and Schneider were fighting elsewhere. He said since there is no evidence that Provencio hurt Schneider, then there is no reason that he should be charged with aggravated battery.McQuin said, he too has doubts that there is enough evidence to convict Provencio of aggravated battery. But he told Hoeme he was not prepared to rule on the matter and would like to see what the jury thinks.McQuin also said the only solid evidence linking Provencio to Schneider was Wednesday’s testimony of Nispel.Nispel said on the stand that he was fighting with Provencio in the opposite ditch, when he was able to escape, get in his truck and make a U-turn. It was only then that he said he saw Provencio along with Reedy kicking an unconscious Schneider.Hoeme said that there is no shred of evidence that links Provencio to any of the injuries that Schneider incurred.Both men testified last week the brawl was initiated by a verbal confrontation between Provencio and Schneider, before Nispel arrived. However, when Nispel did arrive, Provencio diverted his attention to Nispel. The melee ensued when Provencio and Nispel started fighting in the opposite ditch while Reedy and Schneider were scrapping in front of Schneider’s pink Cadillac.Nispel said once he got away from Provencio, according to his testimony, he told Schneider “let’s get out of here” before getting into his pickup and driving in a southward direction. That was when he called Sumner County 911.Between that brief exchange with Schneider to when Nispel made a U-turn several feet south, Schneider had been knocked to the ground with what appeared to be a blow to the head.Nispel said he didn’t see the blow, but when he started driving forward, the two younger men were kicking at an unconscious Schneider on the ground. He then used his pickup to attempt knock Provencio and Reedy into the ditch.Sumner County Attorney Kerwin Spencer had introduced a metal pipe piece into evidence that was found in Schneider’s pink Cadillac after it was recovered in Caldwell. Provencio and Reedy took Schneider’s car and drove it back into town. However, the judge ruled the metal piece was irrelevant in that there was not enough substantial DNA evidence that the metal piece had anything to do with the brawl.Reedy has pled guilty to aggravated battery last week and is awaiting sentencing in July.Hoeme said it was likely that Reedy made the blow to Schneider and that the only contact Provencio made with Schneider was a swing that never made contact during the initial conversation.“The aggravated battery charge is mitigated by emotion,” Hoeme said. “But there is no solid evidence that is supported by law and facts. You take out the emotion and you do not have a case.”Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more