Councilman Mark Kersey announces exit from 38th state Senate District race due

first_imgSTATEMENT—Recent family health issues have arisen that will prevent me from commuting to and from Sacramento on a regular basis. As such I will be ending my campaign for the state Senate. (1)— Mark Kersey (@markkersey) March 5, 2018The Republican announced his decision this morning via Twitter. He said the unspecified health issues would prevent him from commuting to and from Sacramento on a regular basis.Kersey said he will also step down from his post as vice president of the League of California Cities.“This is a very difficult decision because my broad-based support, our strong fundraising, and the polling all indicate that my path to victory in this race was clear,” he said. “However, family comes before politics, and it’s extremely tough to provide the support they need from 500 miles away.”Kersey’s departure leaves three candidates who have declared their intention to enter the race to succeed Sen. Joel Anderson, R-El Cajon. They are Democrat Jeff Griffith, a board member of the Palomar Health District; former Republican Assemblyman Brian Jones of Santee; and libertarian Antonio Salguero.Anderson is being termed out next year in the seat that represents suburban San Diego, Santee, Escondido and much of rural East County. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — San Diego City Councilman Mark Kersey announced Monday he is ending his run for the 38th state Senate District seat, citing “family health issues.” Posted: March 5, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom March 5, 2018 Councilman Mark Kersey announces exit from 38th state Senate District race due to ‘family health issues’ Updated: 4:52 PMlast_img read more

ANSOM Microscope Achieves Sub 10nm Resolution

first_imgThe idea behind near-field microscopy is to offer a technique by which extremely small structures (at the nanometer level) can be measured and manipulated. However, 20 nanometers has been the best resolution accomplished. Until now. “We were able to resolve molecules when they were only 15 nanometers apart,” Stephen Quake tells PhysOrg.com. Quake and his group at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena have created a fluorescence near-field microscope that can distinguish single molecules. The results are published in an article titled “Fluorescence Near-Field Microscopy of DNA at Sub-10 nm Resolution” in Physical Review Letters.“Conventional light microscopes use lenses, and so their imaging properties are limited by the properties of these lenses,” Quake explains. “The main limitation is the wavelength of light. But for the last 20 years, near-field microscopy has provided ways to look at objects without being limited by the wavelength of light. For the most part, that has meant two to four times better than the diffraction limit.”Along with Ziyang Ma, Jordan Gerton and Lawrence Wade, Quake designed and built a microscope that worked with fluorescence near-field microscopy (ANSOM — apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope). In their Letter, the authors describe how fluorescence fluctuations and the limited number of photons available before the molecule is destroyed has created problems in imaging fluorescent molecules. However, thanks to a new phase filtering method, Quake’s group demonstrates how this new kind of microscope can be useful for any number of applications, but especially for biomolecules like DNA.In fact, Quake and his collaborators used DNA to test their microscope. “One of the most stringent tests for a microscope is to put two items together and see how close you can get them and still tell them apart.” He points out that in near-field microscopy this test is not often done. “But we wanted rigorous evidence that the resolution is as high as we claim.” Quake feels that this new kind of microscope could be valuable if commercially produced. “If a commercial manufacturer picked these up and got them into labs, it could greatly advance the frontiers of both biology and nanoscience. They could be used as tools to learn more about the function of macromolecules.”According to the Letter, the microscope’s phase filtering method can also be applied to such things a nanoantennas and supersharp carbon nanotube probes. The resolution of both of these instruments could be improved with the group’s process. Additionally, the microscope could be altered to work on a level that approaches the resolution of an electron microscope.Quake predicts that there will be more to this new fluorescence near-field microscope. “So far, we only have results from molecules in air,” he says. “The next step is to make it work in water, and we have been modifying the instrument for that purpose.” The advantages to having such a microscope are obvious. Right now, with an electron microscope (which has sharper resolution), biomolecules cannot be observed directly in their natural conditions. But this new microscope, if properly adapted, could change that. “We could image live cells, for example. Look at things in motion. Observe proteins that are on the cell surface membranes. This microscope offers a powerful new tool for imaging single molecules and nanostructures.”By Miranda Marquit, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: ANSOM Microscope Achieves Sub 10nm Resolution (2007, January 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-01-ansom-microscope-10nm-resolution.htmlcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Bytons CEO Shares Why His Companys Intuitive Electric SUV Is the Future

first_img 5 min read CES is ramping up in Las Vegas this weekend, with today marking the global launch of a new Chinese electric vehicle brand.The executive team behind Byton unveiled a nearly production-ready version of what they refer to as their “smart intuitive vehicle,” an all-electric SUV with a futuristic-looking dashboard.“The target of Byton is to be the first player in the market that can provide products for smart mobility as part of a smart living scenario in the future,” Byton CEO Carsten Breitfeld told Entrepreneur.By labeling the vehicle “smart intuitive,” the brand aims to signify it’s focused less on driving and more on the user experience the car’s passengers have.Its defining feature is its massive 49- by 10-inch display across its dashboard, allowing everyone in the vehicle to see the content on the screen. Even the steering wheel, the part of the vehicle that most closely resembles a traditional car, has an eight-inch touchscreen on it. (The name Byton comes from the phrase “bytes on wheels.”)Image credit: BytonThe interior tech has voice and gesture control integrated into its design, as well as the capability to identify various drivers and their seat and temperature preferences, even between vehicles. It will incorporate 5G connectivity and drive 400 miles on a single charge — and reach an 80 percent charge in 30 minutes.Image credit: BytonMachine learning will allow the interface to make personalized suggestions for users, and facial and emotional recognition will also allow the vehicle to adapt to its user (e.g. unlocking doors). It will also have the ability to sense its surroundings and communicate data to other Byton vehicles on the road.The brand, which plans to begin selling its crossover vehicles in China in late 2019, nests under Future Mobility Corp, a company co-founded in 2016 by Breitfeld and fellow industry veteran Daniel Kirchert. The vehicles will sell for the equivalent of roughly $45,000, and the company estimates they will be available in the U.S. by mid-2020.So far, the company has raised nearly $300 million across seed and series A rounds and plans to close its series B this quarter. Last month, it opened a North American headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif., to house up to 300 employees. U.S. recruits have joined from Apple, Audi, BMW, Delphi, Ford, Google, Mercedes, Tesla, Toyota and more.Byton CEO Carsten Breitfeld.Image credit: BytonThe company also has offices in Munich, Germany, as well as Nanjing, China, where it is based. To get an initial 100,000 SUVs on the market by next year, the company is constructing a plant in Nanjing. So far, it’s secured high-profile suppliers Bosch and Faurecia to make its high-tech interior a reality.Related: Humans Can Fly in This Drone-Like Electric Hybrid ‘Octocopter’At CES this year, Byton’s debut harkens memories of another electric vehicle startup, Faraday Future, and the surrounding hype at the 2017 show. The latter company experienced a technical difficulty when a demonstration of the FF 91’s self-parking feature failed. Faraday Future has also had its share of financial setbacks and leadership struggles. A Nevada state regulator likened the company to a Ponzi scheme, and by the end of 2017, the company’s VP of design, CFO and CTO had all resigned.Breitfeld would not comment about Faraday Future specifically, but he noted that Byton’s “approach is first of all, to create an affordable vehicle. He adds: “Most importantly, we created this company in a way that our investors are putting the money in, but we as a management team, we run the company. There’s not single investor who has the control or can override decisions. We as a management team, have the vision, know-how and business plan.”The biggest obstacle to overcome before rolling out electric, self-driving vehicles in the U.S. is the speed with which the government and society are getting on board. That’s one reason the brand is rolling out in China first, Breitfeld explains. The government is prioritizing the infrastructure for autonomous and electric vehicles.Byton plans to sell direct to consumer and through showrooms operated by third-party sales agents. By 2022, the brand intends to launch two other vehicles: a sedan and a seven-seater multi-purpose vehicle. But the company is looking far beyond cars.“When we created the company, we named it Future Mobility Corporation, not ‘Future Car Corporation,’” Breitfeld says. “Ten years from now, besides selling our product, we probably will offer mobility services based on our product. We want to be a leading company in creating products and offering services for smart living environments in general.”Entrepreneur will be on the ground at CES beginning Jan. 8. Check our Instagram story (@entrepreneur) between Jan. 9 and 10 to see Associate Editor Lydia Belanger’s test ride in a Byton vehicle. January 7, 2018 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globalcenter_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

Sunwing gets a jump on Boxing Week with savings Dec 23 –

first_img Friday, December 23, 2016 Posted by Share Tags: Sunwing Travelweek Group center_img Sunwing gets a jump on Boxing Week with savings Dec. 23 – 30 TORONTO — Sunwing’s Massive Boxing Week Sale kicks off today and runs through midnight on Dec. 30, offering savings of up to 60% on all-inclusive packages to top resorts across Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America.One resort available in the sale, top Sunwing pick Memories Holguin, is recommended for its tropical beachfront setting bordered by lush vegetation and amenities to suit guests of all ages, including five restaurants, an extensive pool complex, kids and teens clubs and varied evening entertainment.Another option, Grand Riviera Princess All Suites & Spa in Riviera Maya, is consistently popular with families, says Sunwing. The accommodation options include rooms that sleep families of five, plus indulgent swim up suites. Younger guests will love the extensive pool complex with pirate-themed splash park and slides; kids’ club and nightly child-friendly entertainment. There are also up to 10 restaurants, a spa and a sports bar. << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more