Student Government promotes discussion of campus issues on online platform

first_imgNotre Dame student government created Onward, an online platform where students could send in university issues they considered in hopes of initiating change, two years ago. However, since its inception student participation with Onward has fallen off dramatically, but the current student government administration is trying to change that.Junior and director of campus technology Sean McMahon said Onward is being moved to Facebook to make it easier for students to use.“[The previous form] was through a strange website that students didn’t know how to find, and the effort of the student government tapered off — it wasn’t nearly as accessible as it was supposed to be,” McMahon said. “So, we’re making it more accessible by moving it to Facebook.”Senior and campus technology board member Jamie Maher said the new platform will allow student government to reply directly to comments and promote discussion among students more efficiently than before.“The old Onward system was less clear and there was potentially not as immediate feedback, but with this Onward page you can see the post immediately show up on the Facebook page,” Maher said. “[For students,] you can immediately comment on it or react to it, which was not available in the previous incarnation.”McMahon said Onward gives students the ability to ensure their problems are being seen and considered by their representatives.“By submitting to Onward you are guaranteeing that your issue is going to be looked at … Our primary concern is that students know that this is always around and always and option for them,” McMahon said.McMahon said student government sees Onward as an opportunity to consistently engage with the student body and understand what is important to them.“It’s great that we’re working really hard on policy initiatives and things that absolutely need to get done,” he said. “But at the end of the day in terms of making sure we’re getting students what they need, sometimes we need to hear back from them, too. So, the purpose of this is to make sure [communication] is not just during the election season but continually part of the process.”A Facebook account is not required for students to use Onward, as comments can be submitted through a Google survey found in the page’s biography or accessible through QR codes on posters across campus, McMahon said. Students can also submit comments anonymously through that same survey.While participation on the platform may vary over time, junior and campus technology board member Sean Scannell said the success of Onward is measured by how aware students are of its availability.“The metric of success is the awareness of this being there,” Scannell said. “We’re not trying to be the most popular page on campus — we’re trying to be the most helpful.”McMahon and Maher said although some issues students have may be more serious than others and not all students will agree on what should be done, Onward is still an important tool for encouraging discourse on campus.“We want any issue, no matter how big or how small, to be able to be discussed and displayed for everyone,” McMahon said.“We’re not just getting an idea and assuming everyone feels one way, we can have a discussion on Onward and can help facilitate a student discussion on both serious topics and something maybe less important but still meaningful to the student body,” Maher said.McMahon said Onward hopes to give every student the opportunity to make the University better.“If we can publicize successes and show that there is potential to create change here just from five seconds of submitting online, then that’s our goal: to know that that’s always an option and they have that outlet to let their voice be heard,” McMahon said. “Complain. Please complain as much as you want. This isn’t just complaining to a friend and mutually agreeing something stinks — this actually gives you the capability to go do something.”Tags: campus technology, Onward, Student governmentlast_img read more

Newmarket is the place to buy with value for money and great location

first_imgGarden Terraces in NewmarketMr Parker said buyers wanted a combination of space and luxury and getting the balance right through architecture and design was the key to the success of the project at Eve on Erneton.“Newmarket as a suburb has evolved rapidly over the last 10 years and developed its own unique feel and style,” he said. “Residents love the idea of being only a few kilometres from the city but also having their local gathering places like Newmarket Village and an abundance of parks.” Garden Terraces in Newmarket is just 500m down the road from Eve on Erneton, both are being developed by Your Style Group as the first major residential developments in Newmarket in four years.THE second development in Newmarket in four years has recently been launched to market on the back of the success of Eve on Erneton.Your Style Group managing director Dean Parker said Eve on Erneton had shown that Newmarket represented better value for money at almost the same distance from the CBD as nearby popular suburbs Windsor and Wilston. Garden Terraces in NewmarketMore from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investorless than 1 hour agoMr Parker said making sure the developments were sympathetic to the surrounding environment was important to achieving approval, and ultimately in driving demand.“The Newmarket market is a little bit different to the inner city market,” he said. “Buyers aren’t interested in living in a high-rise and prefer lower density product than the inner city and city projects currently on offer. “We deliberately went with a range of larger two and three bedroom apartments to cater for this market.” Garden Terraces in NewmarketGarden Terraces has a central open air atrium with shared walkways, greenery and communal areas designed to foster wellbeing and social exchange.All apartments have been designed to maximise cross-ventilation, with the gardens giving private and semi-private subtropical garden spaces and the balconies being deep and shaded for the best in outdoor living.The apartments themselves use a natural pallete of materials and finishes and each has allocated parking.Garden Terraces is within walking distance to some of Brisbane’s best parks and bikeways, serviced by rail and high frequency bus services and is only 500m from Newmarket Shopping Centre with a Coles supermarket, specialty stores, cafes and restaurants. Garden Terraces in Newmarket Garden Terraces has just launched 500m down the road from Eve on Erneton, with 26 one, two and three-bedroom residences designed to mimic that of a typical Queenslander through the filtering of light, breeze and privacy through multiple layered skins.Mr Parker said Newmarket had always been a desirable suburb for buyers because of its proximity to the city and relative affordability, compared to suburbs like Wilston and Windsor. “Development sites in the area have always been scarce and approvals difficult to achieve,” he said. last_img read more

Graphical breakdown of Syracuse basketball’s scholarship situation

first_imgHere’s a breakdown of Syracuse’s scholarship situation. Following the NCAA’s report on Syracuse in March 2015, the Orange was docked 12 scholarships over four years, but that was reduced to eight over four years after SU’s appeal. In 2015-16, Syracuse had 10 players on scholarship, meaning the Orange will now be giving up five scholarships over the next three seasons. According to SU, the team will use 11 scholarships in 2016-17 and 2017-18 and then will use 12 scholarships in 2018-19. Syracuse will return to the full 13 scholarship cap in 2019-20.Bold = Player is on scholarshipItalics = Player has been offered a scholarshipClare Ramirez | Asst. Copy Editor Comments AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 26, 2016 at 8:14 pmlast_img read more