Ten Years Have Passed Since the Death of the Painter ‎Guayasamín, a Symbol of Ecuador

first_imgBy Dialogo March 10, 2009 Quito, Mar 9 (EFE) – Tomorrow the Tree of Life, in whose roots rest the ashes of the artist ‎Oswaldo Guayasamín, a symbol of Ecuador, will receive an emotional visit from the family of the ‎artist on the tenth anniversary of his death.‎ In the gardens of the cultural complex of la Capilla del Hombre, the artist’s architectural work in ‎honor of pre-Colombian America, stands the tree under which rest the ashes of the Ecuadorian ‎painter of faces and hands, who died on March 10, 1999.‎ Ten years later his work is “even more contemporary, because we are permanently searching for ‎reflection and a new culture of peace, and his paintings are a desperate call for the end of ‎humankind’s mutual aggression,” his son Pablo Guayasamín explained to Efe.‎ The Executive Director of the Guayasamín Foundation and one of the artist’s 10 children, Pablo ‎Guayasamín holds up as an example of the artist’s topicality the “Mestizaje,” a painting that ‎represents a young woman “with great strength and spirit, a mixture of the Spanish and the ‎indigenous Indian races.”‎ According to the artist’s son, from this woman “a new society is born” representing “the ‎resurrection of a new race that is more humanitarian and has a better comprehension of its time ‎that has values different from the ones we have and that is much less confrontational; instead, ‎better understanding and respecting the thoughts of one another.”‎ The Ecuadorian master, who used to say that he had 3,000 years of life experience, sadness, ‎and happiness from his indigenous people, found in the denouncement of injustice, poverty, and ‎disparity the sparks of his creations.‎ For that reason, and because he considered transcending the historical moment in which he lived ‎when dealing with eternal issues of human nature, his paintings, with energetic features and ‎occasionally abstractions reminiscent of Picasso, even today conquer perceptions and win new ‎admirers.‎ ‎“There is a large new audience that expands as the work becomes universal” because “it is not in ‎the same historical moment as when he created it, when it was associated with a political vision;” ‎but “is now extended to all people who advocate and respect human rights,” Pablo Guayasamín ‎stated.‎ For the creator, painting is not a labor, “painting is something different, it is like making love, it is ‎something I long for each day,” he said when he was alive, and the same passion he dedicated to ‎art guided him in his search for a common Latin-American identity and his preoccupation with ‎social injustice.‎ Guayasamín, which in Guichua means “white bird flying,” said that the “dark and violent” 20th ‎Century forced him to fill his pictures with “great sadness,” hence the agonized faces in many of ‎his paintings: denunciation of torture and human pain.‎ The artist, then 79 years old, suffered a heart attack in 1999 in a hotel in Baltimore (United ‎States).‎ On one occasion the artist stated that he did not believe in death, that “men get diluted but go on ‎living through their descendants”, and this is what his children will celebrate tomorrow: that ‎Guayasamín remains alive in them and in his art.‎last_img read more

Putin says Russia ban is ‘immoral’ and ‘inhumane’

first_imgRUSSIAN President Vladimir Putin says the country’s Paralympics ban is “outside the bounds of law, morality and humanity”.The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) suspended Russia from the Rio Games starting on September 7 because of state-sponsored doping.Putin said the ruling was “cynical” and “humiliates those who take such decisions”.Only Russian track and field athletes were banned from the Olympics.Putin, speaking at an award ceremony for Russian Olympians at the Kremlin, said the country would hold special competitions for banned Paralympic athletes, with the winners awarded the same prizes as in Rio.Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said Russian Paralympians had taken “collective responsibility for an unproven crime”. (BBC Sport)last_img

Former Auburn coach Pat Dye tests positive for coronavirus while hospitalized

first_imgMORE: Tom Brady’s new TB12 product criticized as exploiting coronavirus fears Former Auburn football coach Pat Dye is expected to recover from the kidney-related issues that sent him to the hospital, where the 80-year-old recently tested positive for the novel coronavirus, his son told ESPN.Pat Dye Jr. said his father’s positive COVID-19 test “occurred a number of days ago during a routine precautionary test pursuant to his hospitalization for kidney-related issues,” adding that Pat Dye Sr. “has essentially been asymptomatic for the virus.” Dye, who also served as Auburn’s athletic director from 1981 to 1991 while he coached the Tigers’ football team from 1981 to 1992, reportedly has been living at his farm in Notasulga, Ala.”We fully anticipate his release from the hospital in the next few days once his kidney function is stable,” Pat Dye Jr. told ESPN of his father. “On behalf of my family, I want to thank everyone for the overwhelming support for Dad and our family upon the reporting of this news.”Pat Dye Sr., a College Football Hall of Famer, compiled a record of 99-39-4 in 12 seasons as Auburn’s football coach. His success is why Auburn’s football team now plays its home games on Pat Dye Field at Jordan-Hare Stadium.last_img read more