Amec’s ambition

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Newmarket is the place to buy with value for money and great location

first_imgGarden Terraces in NewmarketMr Parker said buyers wanted a combination of space and luxury and getting the balance right through architecture and design was the key to the success of the project at Eve on Erneton.“Newmarket as a suburb has evolved rapidly over the last 10 years and developed its own unique feel and style,” he said. “Residents love the idea of being only a few kilometres from the city but also having their local gathering places like Newmarket Village and an abundance of parks.” Garden Terraces in Newmarket is just 500m down the road from Eve on Erneton, both are being developed by Your Style Group as the first major residential developments in Newmarket in four years.THE second development in Newmarket in four years has recently been launched to market on the back of the success of Eve on Erneton.Your Style Group managing director Dean Parker said Eve on Erneton had shown that Newmarket represented better value for money at almost the same distance from the CBD as nearby popular suburbs Windsor and Wilston. Garden Terraces in NewmarketMore from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investorless than 1 hour agoMr Parker said making sure the developments were sympathetic to the surrounding environment was important to achieving approval, and ultimately in driving demand.“The Newmarket market is a little bit different to the inner city market,” he said. “Buyers aren’t interested in living in a high-rise and prefer lower density product than the inner city and city projects currently on offer. “We deliberately went with a range of larger two and three bedroom apartments to cater for this market.” Garden Terraces in NewmarketGarden Terraces has a central open air atrium with shared walkways, greenery and communal areas designed to foster wellbeing and social exchange.All apartments have been designed to maximise cross-ventilation, with the gardens giving private and semi-private subtropical garden spaces and the balconies being deep and shaded for the best in outdoor living.The apartments themselves use a natural pallete of materials and finishes and each has allocated parking.Garden Terraces is within walking distance to some of Brisbane’s best parks and bikeways, serviced by rail and high frequency bus services and is only 500m from Newmarket Shopping Centre with a Coles supermarket, specialty stores, cafes and restaurants. Garden Terraces in Newmarket Garden Terraces has just launched 500m down the road from Eve on Erneton, with 26 one, two and three-bedroom residences designed to mimic that of a typical Queenslander through the filtering of light, breeze and privacy through multiple layered skins.Mr Parker said Newmarket had always been a desirable suburb for buyers because of its proximity to the city and relative affordability, compared to suburbs like Wilston and Windsor. “Development sites in the area have always been scarce and approvals difficult to achieve,” he said. last_img read more

The imposition of silence in St. Mark

first_imgLocalNews The imposition of silence in St. Mark by: – February 11, 2012 22 Views   no discussions Photo credit: measureofdoubt.blogspot.comThe healing of leprosy in the Gospels focuses on two things: a command to inform the authorities and make the appropriate offering for the cure; secondly, a command to keep it otherwise to yourself. In Mark, the first feature seems not nearly as urgent as the second.Apart from fulfilling the ritual requirement, the leper (or the recipient of the miracle generally) is put under a strict obligation to keep the whole thing quiet.Why did Jesus issue such a command as the latter ? He must have known that human nature being what it is, people healed of very disabling sickness would talk about it – which is what they all did, and to all and sundry.There have been a couple of reasons historically given for Jesus’ action. One influential reason is that he knew he had to counteract the prevailing notions of the function of the Messiah, and that miraculous performances would fuel the wrong sort of expectation. There’s something to this view, I think. There was a sharp contrast between prevailing view of the character of the Messiah (which the disciples also shared) and Jesus’ own view. We should remember, for instance, that even after the resurrection, when the disciples (should have and) seemed to have gone beyond their former understanding, Peter still asked Jesus: Are you now going to establish the kingdom? By kingdom he meant the concrete political kingdom of Judah, of course. So the old convictions hadn’t yet died despite everything. For Peter it effectively died only with his own crucifixion.The interpretation I prefer has to do with another choice Jesus made, not so much in keeping with his view of the Messiah, as opposed to his countrymen’s, but his choice for the importance of faith over miracle. The great mystics have always known that one of the greatest challenges to faith is the miraculous. This is why they never paid unusual attention to things like levitation, locutions, and visions. They did not deny that sometimes these manifestations are divine gifts, but they insisted on two things, first that authenticity of any gift is shown by the fruits the gift produces. Does it increase the pride of the recipient, and the feeling that one belongs to God’s chosen; or does it effect an increase in humility and service. Overall they wrote that we should pay attention more to faith, to “dark faith,” as St. John of the Cross described it, than to what provokes the wonder of our senses.Walking by faith, however, not by sight, as St. Paul recommended, is not always simple or easy. The road along which we walk is not always smooth; nor do we always proceed with easy step and lightness of heart. It’s not just a winding road, but one that sometimes loses all its contours in mist and fog.That is why Jesus preferred it, I think. It demands more heroism. It the reason why he would not turn stones into bread. That way he would certainly have won many followers. But that would not have been a free faith but one won at the price of the miracle. That faith Jesus did not want. He preferred our free, uncompelled allegiance, that we should adhere to him drawn by the spell of his character and testimony of his words.The Church has in several ways continued this way indicated by Jesus. It certainly does not belittle the reality of the miraculous. How could it, while it serves the most awesome miracle of all, God in the flesh. But it does not make miracles, e.g., the miracles of Lourdes and Fatima, articles of faith, and it always advises us not to prefer the significance of the former over the reality of the latter. In the Gospel of John, the perspective is different from Mark’s. The Jesus of John’s Gospel is more deliberately not the human but the divine Jesus. Miracles are signs of his identity and his origin. So also are the great “I am” statements. In the world of Mark, on the other hand, we are in the theological world of the deliberately human Jesus. There’s no contradiction, of course, between the two. Mark and John are two disciples, two theologians, giving differently valid takes on how the divine is manifested in our midst.By: Father Henry Charles PhD Tweet Sharing is caring!center_img Share Share Sharelast_img read more