Royals Were ‘Looking Forward’ to Seeing Archie for Holidays

first_imgAfter living in Tyler Perry’s Los Angeles mansion, the family of three purchased a Montecito estate. “Meghan visited Montecito in her teens and fell in love with the picturesque scenery and stunning architecture,” a source exclusively told Us in August. “Moving there was always an option, but to begin with, she and Harry wanted to give Los Angeles a shot. Unfortunately, Harry absolutely hated it — the timing was so wrong amid the [coronavirus] pandemic and they lacked privacy.”The insider added that they planned to convert “one of the guest houses into a home” for Markle’s mom, Doria Ragland.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Earlier this month, an insider exclusively told Us that Frogmore Cottage had been “prepped” for the family of three, but the Suits alum, 39, was “not sure” she wanted to journey to the United Kingdom.She and the former military pilot, 36, announced in January that they were stepping back from their duties as senior royal family members.The reveal came one month after Markle and Harry spent the holidays in Canada, separate from the royal family. The pair temporarily lived there ahead of their March move to California.- Advertisement – Staying home for the holidays! The royal family will be missing Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s son, Archie, this Christmas.“Everyone was so looking forward to catching up with them, as well as Archie,” a source exclusively reveals in the new issue of Us Weekly following news that the 17-month-old and his parents will remain in the United States over the holidays. “They’re looking forward to making the most of things regardless.”Royal Family Members Were Looking Forward to Seeing Prince Harry Meghan Markle’s Son Archie for HolidaysArchie, Meghan Markle, and Prince Harry TOBY MELVILLE/POOL/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock- Advertisement – The renovation plans also include a sweet set-up for their toddler. “The outdoor play area will be decked out with swings and slides, a climbing frame and a tea area for Archie and his new little pals,” the source shared. “Meghan’s counting the days until Archie can start interacting with children his own age.”For more on the couple’s holiday plans, watch the video above and check out the latest issue of Us Weekly, on newsstands now!With reporting by Rick EgusquizaListen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories!last_img read more

HHS issues guide for using call centers in emergencies

first_imgNov 8, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently released a guide to help communities retool their health-related call centers into systems for meeting the needs of the public in homes or shelters during emergencies such as a pandemic or bioterrorist attack.Published by the HHS Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the 224-page guide is aimed at boosting the capabilities of poison-control centers, nurse advice lines, drug information centers, and health agency hotlines. It focuses on four main scenarios: anthrax attacks, pandemic influenza, plague, and food contamination.”Community call centers have long been a credible source that people can turn to for health information,” said AHRQ Director Carolyn M. Clancy, MD, in an Oct 26 press release from the agency. “Leveraging these existing resources will allow clinics, outpatient departments, and emergency departments to devote their attention to caring for those in most need of help.”The report was developed for the AHRQ by Denver Health, a member of the agency’s Accelerating Change and Transformation in Organizations and Networks (ACTION) project, the press release said. A national advisory panel of experts in emergency call center services, public health, preparedness planning, and other fields helped draft the guidance.Few resources exist to guide the development of emergency call centers, the report says. However, the authors were able to draw from published reports on the experiences of officials in Toronto and Taiwan during the SARS epidemic.Guidance in the report assumes that the community infrastructure would remain intact so that call centers would be operable. Though the document doesn’t address absenteeism among call-center workers, it covers features, such as interactive response systems, that might reduce the number of employees needed to staff the centers.For communities that have little healthcare call-center capacity, the authors offer suggestions on how to enlist the help of local corporate call-center systems.The report focuses on six response capabilities:Health information to augment risk communications and alleviate the burden on the healthcare system; call centers could direct callers toward medication- or vaccine-dispensing locations and answer frequently asked questionsDisease or injury surveillance to help health officials identify emerging health threatsTriage or decision support to reduce unnecessary hospital visits and reduce costsQuarantine and isolation support to those self-treating or receiving medical care in their homesOutpatient drug information and adverse-event reportingMental health assistance and referralAuthors of the report also developed a tool set to enable public health officials to assess the call-center demand they would face during a public health crisis and what resources they would need to meet it. The set includes checklists and Microsoft Excel worksheets.See also:Oct 26 AHRQ press releasehttp://archive.ahrq.gov/news/press/pr2007/callctrpr.htmAHRQ report on adapting call centers for crisis supporthttp://archive.ahrq.gov/prep/callcenters/last_img read more