Patient Enrollment Opens For Largest Brain Amyloid Scanning Research Study

first_img News | PET-CT | August 15, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Installation of uExplorer Total-body PET/CT United Imaging announced that its uExplorer total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system… read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | PET Imaging | March 03, 2016 Patient Enrollment Opens For Largest Brain Amyloid Scanning Research Study IDEAS Study offers reimbursement for PET imaging to help clarify diagnosis of dementia in patients in whom cause is uncertain News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more News | Stroke | August 16, 2019 Mobile Stroke Unit Gets Patients Quicker Treatment Than Traditional Ambulance Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute…. read more Image courtesy of UTHealth McGovern Medical School Related Content Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more center_img Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more March 3, 2016 — Participating dementia specialists may now enroll patients in the Imaging Dementia—Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study at IDEAS-Study.org. Primary care and other doctors not taking part in the IDEAS Study are encouraged to refer eligible patients to participating physicians.The IDEAS Study will follow more than 18,000 Medicare beneficiaries to determine the clinical value of a brain positron emission tomography (PET) scan to detect the hallmark brain amyloid accumulation of Alzheimer’s disease in diagnosing and managing treatment of patients age 65 and older with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia of uncertain cause. Information from this scan can help exclude underlying Alzheimer’s disease, and may help guide patient management.”We are excited that approved physicians may begin registering patients for the IDEAS Study. We anticipate that results from the study will greatly inform future treatment and coverage decisions that can benefit countless Americans and others around the world,” said Gil D. Rabinovici, M.D., IDEAS Study principal investigator and associate professor of neurology at the University of California, San Francisco.Board-certified neurologists, psychiatrists and geriatric medicine physicians interested in enrolling eligible patients in the IDEAS Study, along with PET facilities that would like to join the study as imaging sites, may apply for participation online using the register/login portal. Participating physicians may enroll eligible patients using the same portal. Background on the study, requirements for participation and a set of frequently asked questions are available on the IDEAS website.”The IDEAS Study will provide the evidence needed to demonstrate the utility of amyloid PET imaging in a clinical setting and for future decision making about insurance coverage for what we believe to be an important diagnostic tool,” said Maria Carrillo, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association chief science officer and IDEAS Study co-chair. “A swift and accurate diagnosis has a huge impact on access to Alzheimer’s treatments, eligibility for research trials, plus much-needed support and information services.”The IDEAS Study will not directly recruit patients. Participants must instead be referred into the study by dementia specialists. Dementia specialists will enroll patients whose cases meet the study enrollment criteria and refer them for an amyloid PET scan. Amyloid PET scans will be performed and interpreted by a nuclear medicine physician or radiologist, with results provided to the ordering physician for disclosure to the patient and to support further diagnostic decisions. Scan results and diagnosis will be captured for the study.Participating PET facilities and interpreting physicians will be reimbursed for the scans under the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Coverage with Evidence Development (CED) policy that requires research study participation as a condition of Medicare payment. This is currently the only way a brain amyloid PET scan will be covered for Medicare beneficiaries.The IDEAS Study is led by the Alzheimer’s Association and managed by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN).For more information: www.ideas-study.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享last_img read more

Limassol roadworks uncover mediaeval building

first_imgArchaeological finds possibly dating from the 13th century have been discovered during roadworks in Limassol’s old town, the antiquities department said on Monday.“Foundations of architectural remains of a monumental medieval building have been found on Ayias Theklis street,” archaeological officer Giannis Violaris told the Cyprus Mail.The roadworks in the old town are a €2.5 million plus VAT project to widen the roads surrounding the marina to four lanes, two in each direction, starting from Commandarias street until Siafi and Kioproulouzate streets.“It didn’t come as a surprise that we found these antiquities, it is an area rife with history as it is so close to the castle. We were prepared for this.”Stratigraphy is the next step the antiquities department will take, trying to discover if there are older archaeological finds under the most recently discovered ones that could be from an older time.“The ones we have found are most likely from the Middle Ages. There could be something underneath that from earlier,” Violaris said.Once the studies are completed, a decision will be taken as to what should be done. However Violaris believes the section will probably be backfilled and protected – meaning that instead of covering the findings with asphalt for the road, it will be covered with sand so it can still be used as a road.“It is a very difficult location, it is on a popular street cars use.”In the meantime, contractors are continuing their work by moving on to other streets until the antiquities department wraps up its work.“Our work won’t affect the project. Now if something important is discovered though and we will need three months, of course we will have to do that. The right course of action will be taken depending on what we find,” Violaris said.Thasos Aphanis, Limassol district officer of the public works department told the Cyprus Mail “works will still go on for the project, without causing disturbance on the scheduled duration of the project.”The 18-month project, currently in its first phase aims to improve the roads connecting Franklin Roosvelt Avenue with the seaside. Undertaken by An. Christou Properties and Construction Ltd, 80 per cent of the cost is paid for by the state while the remaining 20 per cent by the Limassol municipality.  You May LikeTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoFigLeaf Beta AppFigLeaf brings You 3 Easy Steps to Privacy on Your Terms…FigLeaf Beta AppUndoAll Pro SaverSmart: Homeowners With A Mortgage In California Take Advantage Of ThisAll Pro SaverUndo Concern over falling tourism numbersUndoTurkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoTwo arrested in connection with attempted murderUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more