HEA Has DeEnergized Transmission Tie Line Due To Swan Lake Fire

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Homer Electric Association, working in coordination with fire managers, on the Swan Lake Fire, has de-energized the 115,000-volt Transmission Tie Line that connects Bradley Lake Hydroelectric facility to the rest of the railbelt utilities. Shelley: “We did that to allow the fire teams to work in and around that line. I know in cooperation with the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge they’ve allowed us to go in there and clear that line and knock some stuff down hopefully to protect the line.”  Bruce Shelley with HEA: “That is the tie line between Anchorage and the rest of the railbelt in the Peninsula. What this means is that we do not have electrons running between Bradley Hydro and Anchorage right now.”  Homer Electric has been in communication with railbelt utilities and ensure that this action will not affect consumer power on the Kenai Peninsula or points north.center_img The request was made by fire managers to de-energize the transmission line that connects Bradley Lake Hydroelectric facility to the rest of the Railbelt utilities. The tie line is a 68 mile long, 115 kV transmission line from the Bradley Lake Power plant to a  substation near HEA’s existing Soldotna substation.last_img read more

My favorite AirPodalternative wireless earbuds are back in stock for 33

first_imgAt $33, these are too good to pass up. BlitzWolf I’m a little obsessed with truly wireless earbuds right now. Here’s what I’ve learned after testing a variety of inexpensive, off-brand products:Smaller is not necessarily better. The tinier they get, the worse battery life is likely to be. They’re also harder to get in and out of your ears (and, often, the case as well).Avoid the ones with touch controls. It’s way too easy to graze those buttons by accident, especially when putting them in and taking them out. Then you find yourself with unwanted results — like accidentally ending up back in pairing mode.Insist on autoconnectivity, meaning the earbuds pair with each other and your phone the moment you take them out of their case.It should come as no surprise that today’s deal — which I’ve shared several times before, but is the cheapest it’s ever been — ticks all those boxes.For a limited time, and while supplies last, the BlitzWolf BW-FYE1 wire-free earbuds are $32.99 shipped when you apply promo code CNETBWFYE1. That’s $17 off the regular price and a whole dollar below last time! 😂 See it at AmazonI use these primarily for listening to podcasts while walking the dog and to music while working at my desk or around the house. For me they’re a perfect fit: easy into the ears, easy out. (Don’t expect a fully noise-isolating seal like you get from some in-ear headphones. Consequently, don’t expect super-deep bass, either.) 21 Photos Amazon Bose LG Sony Apple How to choose the right headphones The Cheapskate Tags reading • My favorite AirPod-alternative wireless earbuds are back in stock for $33 Originally published Jan. 16.Update, May 28: Back in stock.  CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! • I bought a second pair for Mrs. Cheapskate over the holidays. She likes them, too, in large part because they’re so easy to use. I can’t overstate the wonderfulness of “open the box, take out the earbuds, start listening.” And, similarly, “put the earbuds back in the box, close box, done.”On my recommendation, my buddy Doug also bought a pair and likes them a lot, though he notes that when he runs without a hat on (yeah, he runs in the winter — crazy!), they tend to fall out of his ears.My buddy Craig bought a pair and doesn’t like them, though his primary goal was to use them during conference calls — and listeners said he sounded tinny. However, we just got on a call together — me with my earbuds in and him with his — and we both sounded “very good” to each other. It might have been that he was in a noisy place during his business call, and the BlitzWolf’s microphone does a bad job of canceling noise. Bottom line: I love these. I can wear them comfortably for long stretches, and I find the audio quality to be very good overall. They’re a snap to use, and they’re $33. I think before you spend $100 to $200 on something from Apple, Bose or Jabra, you owe it to yourself to try these first.Agree? Disagree? You know the drill.Read more: The best truly wireless headphones Now playing: Watch this: Apple Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR.center_img 1:19 Comments Share your voice See All Best wireless headphones for making calls Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 26 Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Headphones Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy?last_img read more

SAAC Hosts Inaugural Cardinal Games

first_img Print Friendly Version Christine Herring, Senior Woman Administrator, was a member of one of the six staff teams. “The first annual Cardinal Games was a huge success. It was a tremendous opportunity for our student-athletes, staff and coaches to create multi-sport and department teams to compete against each other.  It’s really special seeing the camaraderie within our department and competitive spirit between our student-athletes.” The other six teams were featured of UofL Athletics staff members from various departments and teams including: administration, marketing, academics, facilities, compliance, football, field hockey and volleyball. “The Cardinal Games was a great way to get the athletics department together for a night of fun-filled competition,” said Funke. “It was a great event put on by SAAC and I’m looking already looking forward to next year!” Story Links Softball’s Celene Funke’s Goon Squad finished the night victorious defeating Winner’s Winner which was composed of primarily football coaches and staff. The first year of the Cardinal Games featured 20 teams with 8-12 people per team. Fourteen of the teams were led by student-athlete captains who had selected their squads in a large draft the week before. The University of Louisville’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) hosted the inaugural Cardinal Games event on Monday, April 22 at Cardinal Stadium. Over 200 student-athletes and staff came out for a night full of fun, fellowship and competition. The goal for the day was to accumulate as many points as possible in a series of 11 activities. The games consisted of several bracketed events such as dodge ball, corn hole, spike ball, and kan jam as well as hula hooping, golf chipping, lacrosse passing, and an obstacle course.last_img read more

Kind and Gentle Molecular Machine Could Operate at NearEquilibrium

first_img But R. Dean Astumian, a Physics Professor at the University of Maine, has recently proposed a concept in which molecular machines can operate arbitrarily close to chemical equilibrium at every instant of the cycle, and still perform work at the rate of several micrometers per second against piconewton loads. The study, “Adiabatic operation of a molecular machine,” is published in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“The main significance is conceptual – it changes the way we think about molecular motors,” Astumian told PhysOrg.com. “Much emphasis has been put on the ‘non-equilibrium’ aspects of the system, but in fact this is not really important. The motion of the rings here arises due to a combination of topology that break spatial symmetry, and the slow external modulation that breaks time symmetry. It is also important to recognize that, in the molecular world, we can truly have motors that operate with nearly 100% efficiency.”Astumian’s example of such a molecular machine is a three-ring “catenane” structure that serves as a rotating motor. The catenane, about 3 nanometers in diameter, consists of one large ring with two smaller rings linked to the large ring, like rings on a keychain. Three binding stations on the large ring provide locations where the two small rings can bind, depending on the interaction energy between ring and station. Astumian gets the small rings to move clockwise from station to station around the large ring, a movement that results in mechanical cycling. Further, he achieves this movement without any heat gain or heat loss and without a change of entropy, but simply by thermal noise due to Brownian motion. This type of “adiabatic” system is arbitrarily close to equilibrium at every point of the cycle.The key to making the small rings move from station to station is by periodically modulating the interaction energy. The rings will bind to the station that requires the lowest interaction energy. This modulation must be done slowly enough not to generate heat, but at a sufficient rate to produce significant work. Slowly modulating the energy of a single molecule is challenging, and Astumian explains that it is nearly impossible to do with chemical systems. However, the net interaction energy for many molecules can be slowly modulated by very slow titrations of pH and redox potential. For example, a condition that is strongly acidic and strongly reducing corresponds with high interaction energy at station 2. Therefore, the two rings will bind at stations 1 and 3. Explore further Molecular machines – tiny machines made of molecules that do mechanical work – are usually thought to operate in a state of non-equilibrium. This makes sense, considering that macro-sized machines operate at non-equilibrium, requiring an additional force to move. On the other hand, equilibrium implies that forces cancel each other out, resulting in an unchanging system, often at rest. Then, by titrating with oxidant to reach a strongly oxidizing and strongly basic condition, the energy at station 1 is highest. So the rings now occupy stations 2 and 3. Astumian explains that the rings could switch to this state by either the ring at station 1 moving clockwise to bind at station 2, or the ring at station 3 moving counter-clockwise to bind at station 2. However, after more modulations, the majority (about 75%) of the movements will be clockwise due to the changing energy levels at different stations. By figuring this probability, Astumian concludes that, every time the small rings move around the large ring, the system will complete one-half of a mechanical rotation.He also mentions that there might be more creative architectures where counter-clockwise motions don’t undo the clockwise motions. He likens this mechanism to a ratcheting screwdriver used to drive a screw. When the ratchet turns counter-clockwise to reset itself, it releases so that it doesn’t undo the forward turn of the screw. Although a molecular machine would use thermal noise instead of external torque, the concept is similar. In the molecular machine, one of the small rings could be fixed to prevent counterclockwise motion.“I would say that the biggest challenge is to arrange the molecules on a surface so that the movement can be used to do work on the outside world,” Astumian said. He added that the chemical structures have already been synthesized by David Leigh at the University of Edinburgh, as the next step in the development of the machines.Astumian also explains that operating this system requires a fine balance between modulating slowly enough so that the system is in chemical and mechanical equilibrium at every instant, but rapidly enough to perform substantial work. While biomolecular motors are often described in “violent” terms, he hopes that this “kindler, gentler” description may be more appropriate for designing more efficient molecular machines.“I plan to extend the theory to explain the mechanism of biological motors,” Astumian said. “While they doubtless do not operate exactly by the mechanism described for the three-ring catenane, I think the flavor of how they operate is much better characterized by this near-equilibrium description than by various biological models involving cars, judo throws, and steam engines.”More information: Astumian, R. Dean. “Adiabatic operation of a molecular machine.” PNAS, December 11, 2007, vol. 104, no. 50, 19715-19718.Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Illustration of the possible transitions for a catenane structure that consists of one large ring with three stations for two small rings. The two small rings move around the large ring to bind at a station. Each binding state is favored by a different energetic condition, as indicated. ©2007 PNAS. Image credit: R. Dean Astumian.center_img Citation: ‘Kind and Gentle’ Molecular Machine Could Operate at Near-Equilibrium (2007, December 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-12-kind-gentle-molecular-machine-near-equilibrium.html SLAC makes ‘electron camera,’ a world-class tool for ultrafast science, available to scientists worldwide This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Rep Noble invites residents to open office hour in Plymouth

first_img State Rep. Jeff Noble of Plymouth will host an open office hour on Monday, Sept. 18 from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Plymouth Township Hall Multi-Function Room located at 9955 N. Haggerty Road in Plymouth.“I am committed to meeting residents and discussing matters of state government,” Rep. Noble said. “I look forward to hearing about what issues are important to people in my district.”No appointment is necessary. Those unable to attend may contact Rep. Noble at 517-373-3816 or via email at JeffNoble@house.mi.gov. 08Sep Rep. Noble invites residents to open office hour in Plymouth Categories: Noble Newslast_img

TV platform operator M7 Deutschland is buying Kabe

first_imgTV platform operator M7 Deutschland is buying KabelKiosk, a platform of digital channels and interactive services for cable and IPTV networks in Germany, from Eutelsat. M7 Deutschland, an affiliate of European satellite services firm M7 Group, said that under the deal it will continue to develop KabelKiosk and will launch new IPTV and OTT video delivery platforms.The acquisition, which was made for undisclosed terms, includes a long-term agreement for the lease of multiple transponders at Eutelsat’s 9° East orbital position. Eutelsat will also continue to provide uplink services for the KabelKiosk platform from its teleports in Italy and France.In addition, Eutelsat and M7 Deutschland said they have agreed to establish a strategic partnership for connected TV, combining broadcast and on-demand video services.“We are confident that KabelKiosk will further grow its existing cable business, as well as achieve additional growth through the exciting new opportunities provided by the new IPTV and OTT delivery platforms,” said Kees Färber, managing director of M7 Deutschland.Eutelsat CEO and chairman, Michel de Rosen, added: “Having built a strong video distribution platform in Germany it is now time for a new shareholder to drive KabelKiosk forward as it embarks on a new chapter of expansion.“Following the recent launch by M7 of its new Hungarian pay-TV venture from our 9° East video neighbourhood, the transaction announced today strengthens our relationship with the M7 group of companies.”M7 Group already operates local European TV brands such as: CanalDigitaal and Online.nl in the Netherlands; TV Vlaanderen in Flanders; TéléSAT in French speaking Belgium; AustriaSat and HD Austria in Austria; AustriaSat Magyarország in Hungary; and CS Link and Skylink for the Czech and Slovak market.last_img read more