Drivers in Anchorage Alaska can pay for a parking ticket in school

first_imgEnlarge Image mcdomx/Getty Images Drivers in Anchorage, Alaska can now pay for a parking ticket in pens and pencils, in an effort to help underprivileged kids get enough school supplies, the Anchorage Daily News reports.Specifically, drivers with a ticket that’s under 30 days old can pay their $20 fine by submitting 200 No. 2 pencils or 100 black or blue pens during the next two weeks. Now, before all you Alaskan parking scofflaws start twirling your mustaches and looking at buying pencils by the crate, EasyPark — the company that handles parking enforcement for Anchorage — will only let you pay for one ticket this way.(As a resident of Los Angeles, I want to take a second and imagine living in a place where parking tickets only cost $20. If parking enforcement attempted to offer this kind of alternate payment idea here, the city would likely drown in a sea of Bics and Ticonderogas, but I digress.)”Providing assistance by accepting school supply items for parking citations is a positive start in supporting our local students for a successful school year,” said Demetric Tuggle, parking director for EasyPark, in a statement.If you live in Anchorage and want to pay a ticket off with writing implements, you can go to the EasyPark office at 440 B St. between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays from Friday through Aug. 9.We checked, and no, Ms. Tuggle is not actually a character from a Thomas Pynchon novel, she’s just a lady trying to help the kids in Anchorage, and we support that. If you don’t have a ticket, but you want to donate school supplies anyway, you can contact Helping Us Give School Supplies (Hugss) here. Share your voice 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Post a comment 2019 Jeep Wrangler review: First-place performance 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything bettercenter_img 0 Car Culture Random Tags More From Roadshowlast_img read more

Hayes Looks to Raise Fines on Liquor Sales to Minors in Baltimore

first_imgralejandro@afro.com Del. Antonio Hayes has submitted a bill to the General Assembly to raise the maximum fine for a first-time offense of selling alcohol to minors in Baltimore City. (Photo courtesy of Del. Antonio Hayes)Baltimore City has the lowest maximum fine – tied with Calvert County – for a first-time offense of selling alcohol to minors. Del. Antonio Hayes (D-Baltimore City) has introduced a bill in the General Assembly to double the current maximum fine, from $500 to $1,000.“This bill, like other pieces of my legislation, is really the brainchild of people in communities that I represent,” said Hayes, who tells the AFRO that his bill was spurred by the advocacy of Dr. Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew A. Henson Neighborhood Association, on the issue of liquor sales to minors.Currently, in Baltimore City, the Board of Liquor License Commissioners (BLLC) can impose a fine of up to $500 on an establishment for its first offense of selling alcohol to minors. Subsequent offenses allow a maximum fine of $3,000, and Hayes says his bill, House Bill 868 (HB0868), would simply put the initial fine more on par with the fine for subsequent offenses.Baltimore City’s current maximum fine is well below that of other counties in the state, according to the freshman delegate. In adjacent Baltimore County, the maximum fine for a first offense of selling alcohol to minors is $2,000. In Prince George’s it is $12,500, and in Montgomery County it is $20,000, says Hayes.“Most liquor stores, $500 is what they do in two to three hours, so it’s not really sending them a message of the importance of [not] serving alcohol to minors,” said Hayes.Cheatham tells the AFRO that there are 15 establishments selling or serving alcohol in the vicinity of his neighborhood, four of which were fined last year for selling alcohol to minors.“What we were seeing was not only violence and crime associated with the liquor stores, but we were beginning to see an uptick in the sale of liquor to young people because they weren’t checking the IDs,” said Cheatham, who says the current BLLC has been more aggressive in policing sales to minors, but that its penalties need more teeth.“Where it is now . . . that’s far too little when you consider you sold liquor to a minor,” said Cheatham.According to Michelle Bailey-Hedgepeth, executive secretary of the BLLC for Baltimore City, 44 establishments were fined for selling alcohol to minors in fiscal year 2013, with approximately 75 establishments being fined for, or charged with, selling alcohol to minors in fiscal 2014 (running from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015).The process for fining an establishment begins with a police vice operation, generally involving an underage cadet, who attempts to purchase alcohol. If the undercover cadet is not ID’d and sold alcohol (or sold alcohol despite an ID showing the cadet was underage), the police file a report with BLLC who then holds a hearing to determine guilt and the appropriate fine.“Last year [vice] visited approximately 150 locations throughout the city,” said Bailey-Hedgepeth.“The majority of the liquor stores and taverns in the district are responsible establishments,” said Hayes, “it’s just that there’s a couple of bad apples that are not responsible, so this [bill] is really to go after the ones who are not being responsible.”Because HB0868 simply raises the maximum fine that can be assessed against an establishment for a first offense of selling alcohol to minors, the bill has no direct costs for implementation.last_img read more