HEA Has DeEnergized Transmission Tie Line Due To Swan Lake Fire

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Homer Electric Association, working in coordination with fire managers, on the Swan Lake Fire, has de-energized the 115,000-volt Transmission Tie Line that connects Bradley Lake Hydroelectric facility to the rest of the railbelt utilities. Shelley: “We did that to allow the fire teams to work in and around that line. I know in cooperation with the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge they’ve allowed us to go in there and clear that line and knock some stuff down hopefully to protect the line.”  Bruce Shelley with HEA: “That is the tie line between Anchorage and the rest of the railbelt in the Peninsula. What this means is that we do not have electrons running between Bradley Hydro and Anchorage right now.”  Homer Electric has been in communication with railbelt utilities and ensure that this action will not affect consumer power on the Kenai Peninsula or points north.center_img The request was made by fire managers to de-energize the transmission line that connects Bradley Lake Hydroelectric facility to the rest of the Railbelt utilities. The tie line is a 68 mile long, 115 kV transmission line from the Bradley Lake Power plant to a  substation near HEA’s existing Soldotna substation.last_img read more

Facebook suspends Russiabacked pages targeting millennials

first_img Tags Share your voice Facebook has reportedly suspended three popular video pages designed to appeal to millennials after discovering the pages were backed by the Russian government. The pages, which Facebook suspended Friday, are run by Maffick Media, whose majority stakeholder is Ruptly, a subsidiary of Russia-backed RT, CNN reports. Facebook plans to contact the people running the pages and ask them to disclose their affiliations to get their pages back, CNN said. The move is unusual for Facebook, as it doesn’t require users to provide information about parent companies. But in an effort in increase transparency on the platform, Facebook has taken aggressive steps to identify covert government-supported information on its service. With more than 2 billion users worldwide, Facebook has been under pressure to reduce disinformation, hate speech and inauthentic behavior on the site. In 2017, the tech firm revealed it found evidence that Russians used the social network to meddle in the 2016 US presidential election and sow discord among Americans. Since then, Facebook has pulled down hundreds of accounts including some tied to influence campaigns by Iran. Facebook said that users shouldn’t be misled about who’s behind the pages they connect with. “Just as we’ve stepped up our enforcement of coordinated inauthentic behavior and financially motivated spam over the past year, we’ll continue improving so people can get more information about the Pages they follow,” a Facebook spokesman said in a statement. “For example, we’re now rolling out in phases an update to Pages with large audiences to include information about the primary countries they’re managed from. “Since this feature isn’t live yet for all, we’ll be reaching out to admins of these Pages to ask that they disclose this additional information and their affiliation with their parent company to get back on the platform,” Facebook said Maffick Media denied breaking Facebook’s rules. “We did not violate any of Facebook’s policies whatsoever. None of our content promotes disinformation or fake news,” the company said in a statement to its website Sunday. Disinformation has long been a part of Russia’s foreign policy strategy, and social media has allowed the trolling effort to expand on a viral scale. US intelligence agencies have warned Congress that these campaigns will continue in the future. The pages, which focused on current events, history and the environment, collected more than 30 million views since September, CNN reported. Originally published at 1:25 p.m. PT Updated at 3:15 p.m. with Facebook statement. Facebook Comments Internet Tech Industry 2last_img read more

Fuehrings Layup Propels UofL to 5856 Win Over Arizona State

first_img LAS VEGAS, Nev. – Sam Fuehring’s layup with three seconds remaining gave No. 5 Louisville a 58-56 win over No. 19 Arizona State on Friday afternoon at the South Point Shootout in Las Vegas, Nev.Louisville (4-0) entered the fourth quarter trailing 41-37, but outscored the Sun Devils 21-15 the rest of the way.The Cardinals trailed 45-41 with 8:17 to go and then went on an 8-0 run to take a 49-45 lead midway through the fourth. They held the lead until Arizona State’s Sophia Elenga made both free throws to tie the game at 56-56 with 11 seconds to go. That set the stage for the game-winner as Dana Evans drove the lane and found Fuehring underneath for the layup with three seconds remaining. Arica Carter then stole the inbounds pass to seal the victory.Fuehring led the way for the Cards with 18 points and nine rebounds. She finished 7-13 from the floor and 4-5 from the free throw line, making some crucial free throws down the stretch.Asia Durr added 14 points and three assists, while Dana Evans finished with 11 points and six assists. Evans scored eight of her 11 points in the fourth quarter.UP NEXTLouisville: The Cardinals conclude play in Las Vegas against Hartford tomorrow at 3 p.m. ET.For the latest on Louisville women’s basketball, visit GoCards.com, follow the team’s Twitter account at @UofLWBB or on Facebook at facebook.com/UofLWBB.Print Friendly Version Story Links Box Score (PDF) last_img read more

ANSOM Microscope Achieves Sub 10nm Resolution

first_imgThe idea behind near-field microscopy is to offer a technique by which extremely small structures (at the nanometer level) can be measured and manipulated. However, 20 nanometers has been the best resolution accomplished. Until now. “We were able to resolve molecules when they were only 15 nanometers apart,” Stephen Quake tells PhysOrg.com. Quake and his group at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena have created a fluorescence near-field microscope that can distinguish single molecules. The results are published in an article titled “Fluorescence Near-Field Microscopy of DNA at Sub-10 nm Resolution” in Physical Review Letters.“Conventional light microscopes use lenses, and so their imaging properties are limited by the properties of these lenses,” Quake explains. “The main limitation is the wavelength of light. But for the last 20 years, near-field microscopy has provided ways to look at objects without being limited by the wavelength of light. For the most part, that has meant two to four times better than the diffraction limit.”Along with Ziyang Ma, Jordan Gerton and Lawrence Wade, Quake designed and built a microscope that worked with fluorescence near-field microscopy (ANSOM — apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope). In their Letter, the authors describe how fluorescence fluctuations and the limited number of photons available before the molecule is destroyed has created problems in imaging fluorescent molecules. However, thanks to a new phase filtering method, Quake’s group demonstrates how this new kind of microscope can be useful for any number of applications, but especially for biomolecules like DNA.In fact, Quake and his collaborators used DNA to test their microscope. “One of the most stringent tests for a microscope is to put two items together and see how close you can get them and still tell them apart.” He points out that in near-field microscopy this test is not often done. “But we wanted rigorous evidence that the resolution is as high as we claim.” Quake feels that this new kind of microscope could be valuable if commercially produced. “If a commercial manufacturer picked these up and got them into labs, it could greatly advance the frontiers of both biology and nanoscience. They could be used as tools to learn more about the function of macromolecules.”According to the Letter, the microscope’s phase filtering method can also be applied to such things a nanoantennas and supersharp carbon nanotube probes. The resolution of both of these instruments could be improved with the group’s process. Additionally, the microscope could be altered to work on a level that approaches the resolution of an electron microscope.Quake predicts that there will be more to this new fluorescence near-field microscope. “So far, we only have results from molecules in air,” he says. “The next step is to make it work in water, and we have been modifying the instrument for that purpose.” The advantages to having such a microscope are obvious. Right now, with an electron microscope (which has sharper resolution), biomolecules cannot be observed directly in their natural conditions. But this new microscope, if properly adapted, could change that. “We could image live cells, for example. Look at things in motion. Observe proteins that are on the cell surface membranes. This microscope offers a powerful new tool for imaging single molecules and nanostructures.”By Miranda Marquit, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: ANSOM Microscope Achieves Sub 10nm Resolution (2007, January 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-01-ansom-microscope-10nm-resolution.htmlcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more