Four Ways to Avoid Paid Content Suicide

first_imgOnline, search engine optimization (SEO) will eventually trump the advantage of having print in a market. Local newspapers lost the battle for online advertising between 2005 and 2006. That is the year, as documented by the Borrell Associates study on local advertising, when local newspaper’s share of the local online advertising dropped from 43 percent to 36 percent, while being surpassed by local “pure play” media (local online-only media), whose share rose to 38 percent. The online “pure plays” beat the newspapers by loving search more. Without a print vehicle to connect with readers, “pure plays” had to do maximize their search engine optimization (SEO) efforts. Instead of blaming search (Google) for their demise, newspapers should embrace it. A media organization that has a print property AND embraces SEO would crush all competitors!2. Stop Thinking of Content as a Destination, it is an InstigatorMany newspaper Web sites present content with a “If they build it they will come” mentality. Advertisers want a reaction to their ads; a click, a registration, a social media interaction etc. Good content can instigate all of these reactions but will do it much more effectively if is structured into a Web site. I saw a local newspaper Web site present the weather. Good content. But in the same market, a local TV station took the same content and built an e-mail alert that notified commuters of weather conditions during drive times. The alert attracted a desirable demographic audience and sold lots of ads. 3. Research Beyond BlurbismAn insightful piece on CNET by Greg Sandoval quotes Forbes publisher Jim Spanfeller arguing that Google harms publishers when the descriptive blurbs Google publishes satisfy the information need of the people. But one thing that has not changed is that advertisers ultimately want the attention of engaged readers/visitors, not tire kickers. The case could be made that the Google skimmers, who do not click deeper on a story, do not represent “engaged” readers. The ones who click for more information and go to the publisher’s Web sites probably do. This could be easily researched and brought into sales calls. 4. Rethink Digital DeliveryEvery print publisher needs to rethink their digital delivery options. When content competes for online audiences, the volume and quality of content wins. The Silicon Alley Insider reports that the New York Times could cut its circulation costs in half by buying all of their 830,000 long term print subscribers a $359 Kindle. Digital magazines can dramatically reduce the cost of magazine digital delivery and there are business models emerging where ads will sell well into them.     Digital-only magazines, like Monkey in the U.K. and VIV in the U.S. are profitable and ad supported. They are not digital replicas of print magazines, designed largely for the convenience of print readers to store and search their print editions digitally. They are designed to compete online for an audience and fight for ad dollars.The sorry state of newspapers is the story of opportunity lost. Why can’t newspapers play the SEO game and use their content to instigate response? Newspapers can. They can embrace SEO, they can rethink digital delivery, they can redesign their Web sites to provoke reaction.But they can’t do that if they embrace paid content. That’s suicide. Rupert Murdoch recently announced a plan where his newspaper Web sites would start charging for access to content. In the same week, at the FIPP World Magazine conference in London, Conde Nast International Chairman, and Jonathan Newhouse echoed the call for paid content. Lunacy. What is putting magazines and especially newspapers out of business is not a failure to charge for content but a failure to sell advertising.The day a local newspaper starts charging for local news is the day the media they compete with—local TV stations, radio stations, and local Web sites—jump in and steal what ad revenue they have left.  Here are four suggestions for changing this:1. Embrace Search, Don’t Blame it for Your Problems Josh Gordon is president of SmarterMediaSales.com, a training and consulting company that helps publishers grow their online business. Gordon also publishes a blog at AdSalesBlog.com.last_img read more

Autonomous car beta test will first benefit the blind

first_imgAcura RDXThe third-generation Acura RDX squeaks into the top ten list with larger proportions, plenty of interior space and better handling than its predecessor. Forward collision warning with collision mitigation braking, adaptive cruise control that works even in low-speed traffic, lane-keeping steering assist and road departure mitigation are all standard across the board. Like its MDX counterpart, the RDX is available with the A-Spec styling package.The RDX sports a 2.0-liter, turbocharged, four-cylinder engine. Output is stated at 273 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque, and it’s mated to a 10-speed automatic transmission. The new RDX is built in East Liberty, Ohio. 2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Bison: A tougher off-roader 0 Honda RidgelineAgain keeping the status quo, the Honda Ridgeline maintains third place on the American Made Index. This crossover-that-looks-like-a-truck provides a better ride than a traditional pickup and gets an awesome lockable trunk right in the floor of the bed. And it doesn’t do the truck stuff too badly, either, as it’s able to carry 1,860 pounds of payload and tow 3,500 pounds.The Ridgeline is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 good for 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. That is channeled through a six-speed automatic transmission with available all-wheel drive. It’s built in Lincoln, Alabama. 81 Photos General Motors Chevrolet Honda Jeep Acura 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value 49 Photos 3 Tags Tags 2019 Honda Pilot Elite: A smoother, tech-rich crossover SUV 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2019 Chevy Colorado ZR2 Bison: An off-road animal Chevrolet CorvetteMoving up from the 10th-place slot last year is the 2019 Chevrolet Corvette. While we’ve all been ogling the new mid-engine Corvette, it’s easy to forget what a performance bargain the current-generation ‘Vette is. From the base trim to the Grand Sport to the bonkers ZR1, the Corvette is an American icon.My preference is for the Grand Sport, which strikes a perfect balance between everyday drivability and canyon-carving performance. The 6.2-liter V8 puts out 460 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque. You can get it with a seven-speed manual or eight-speed automatic transmission, but the kicker is the borrowed chassis and aero parts from the beefier Z06. Like I said, perfect balance. The Corvette is made in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Honda OdysseyThe feature-rich Honda Odyssey minivan also retains its number-two slot from last year’s list. While the 2019 model doesn’t see any changes from last, it’s still a darn good choice for families on the go with reconfigurable seats, Wi-Fi and an excellent rear-seat entertainment system. The Cabin Watch video system lets parents keep an eye on their little darlings without turning around in their seats, while Cabin Talk amplifies their voice so no yelling is required.The Odyssey is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 rated for 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. Most trims get a nine-speed automatic but the top Touring and Elite trims now use a 10-speed automatic with stop-start technology. The Honda Odyssey is made in Lincoln, Alabama. 2019 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport loves to hustle 2019 Acura RDX A-Spec: Sharp handling, sharper looks 2019 Honda Ridgeline review: Light duty, heavy punch 52 Photos 2019 GMC Sierra Denali review: So close to greatness 2019 Honda Passport: A well-rounded midsize offering 2019 GMC Canyon: A fancier Colorado Honda PassportThe Honda Passport is a new (well, reborn) entry to both the Honda lineup and the American Made Index. This midsize crossover comes to the fray with great driving dynamics and plenty of tech like the standard Honda Sensing suite of active safety features. An available 8-inch touchscreen gets Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as well as a Wi-Fi hotspot.Under the hood is the stalwart 3.5-liter V6 producing 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. However unlike the Ridgeline, the Passport sends that power through a nine-speed automatic transmission. Having said that, just like the Ridgeline, this is the only powertrain available. The Honda Passport is built in Lincoln, Alabama. 71 Photos Chevrolet ColoradoMaking its debut in the top 10 is the Chevrolet Colorado. Shown here in the tough ZR2 Bison off-road spec, the Chevy Colorado is an excellent truck and one of the two midsize pickups you can get with a diesel engine. Adding to the ZR2’s two-inch lift and front and rear locking differentials, the Bison gets beefier skid plates (trust me, that’s a good thing), steel bumpers and integrated recovery points. Heck, you can even get a snorkel.Base models get a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine with a six-speed manual transmission, but a more popular choice is the 3.6-liter V6 gas engine with 308 horsepower and 275 pound-feet of torque, mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission. Meanwhile, the 2.8-liter diesel pumps out 186 horsepower and a delicious 369 pound-feet of twist and is mated to a six-speed automatic. The Chevy Colorado is built in Wentzville, Missouri. Autonomous Vehicles Auto Tech,Enlarge ImageIt’s all in a day’s work for the Jeep Cherokee, the most American-made car in 2019. Jeep With high trade tensions looming and increasing talk of tariffs, more and more consumers are looking to buy American. Cars.com has released its annual American Made Index, showcasing companies that use the most American-sourced parts and labor in their vehicles. The results may surprise you.Cars.com analyzed more than 100 US-built vehicles for five key data points: manufacturing location, parts sourcing, US employment, engine sourcing and transmission sourcing. You might think something like the Ford F-150 would top the list, but it drops from its No. 5 spot for 2018 and out of the top 10 completely. Even the first-place holder, the Jeep Cherokee, is a pretty global product. It’s a Jeep, sure, but that brand is part of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, an Italian-owned business.Cars.com surveyed 1,000 people and found that half are concerned about automotive import tariffs, with 41% saying they are unsure if tariffs would make them more likely to buy American. Either way, we’re big fans of all the vehicles on this list. These days, buying American doesn’t necessarily mean sticking with a US-based automaker.center_img 10 Photos Enlarge ImageNext month, this autonomous pod will empower blind veterans in England. Aurrigo As autonomous mobility inches closer to widespread use and garners more headlines along the way, it’s easy to dream of a life of convenience. But it’s even easier for folks to forget that there is a whole subset of people for whom self-driving car tech will be more than mere convenience, it will change their lives — the disabled community.One of autonomy’s biggest selling points for the public is its potential to reduce the number of vehicle accidents and fatalities worldwide significantly. But in addition to the convenience possibilities and life-saving potential, UK autonomous mobility company Aurrigo is demonstrating how driverless pods can revolutionize the lives of blind people.Beginning in April, The Telegraph reports, Aurrigo will roll out a six-month beta test in collaboration with Blind Veterans UK that will provide driverless pods that will ferry visually impaired veterans around the charity’s rehabilitation campus at a blistering 15 mph.The beta test will allow Aurrigo to assess how blind riders interact with voice controls to improve the company’s future driverless cars, which use GPS and ultrasonic sensors to navigate the world.”So many of the blind veterans we support say that not being able to drive is one of the most significant things that hits you when you lose your sight,” said retired Maj. Gen. Nick Caplin, chief executive of Blind Veterans UK. 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 9 Photos 2019 Honda Odyssey offers plenty of room and features for families Honda PilotDropping down to seventh place for 2019 is the Honda Pilot. Like its two-row Passport sibling, the three-row Pilot offers parent-focused technology like Cabin Talk as well as myriad standard driver-assistance features through the Honda Sensing tech suite. Honda’s largest crossover offers up nearly 84 cubic feet of cargo space. Honda’s 3.5-liter V6 engine shows up again, making a serviceable 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. Touring and Elite trims get a nine-speed automatic transmission while lower trims have to make do with a six-speed auto. The Honda Pilot is made in Lincoln, Alabama. 18 Photos 68 Photos 69 Photos 2019 Honda Ridgeline: The commuter’s pickup truck Post a comment GMC CanyonIf you’re looking for a slightly fancier version of the Colorado that’s more focused on luxe than dirt, check out the GMC Canyon. The top Denali trim gets standard heated and ventilated front seats as well as a heated steering wheel. Maximum payload capability is 1,665 pounds while max towing is a fairly healthy 7,600 pounds.The Canyon is available with the same 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine, 3.6-liter V6 or 2.8-liter diesel as the Chevrolet Colorado. It’s also built in Wentzville, Missouri. Acura MDXMoving up one slot to sixth place on the American Made Index is the non-hybrid variant of the Acura MDX. With its SH-AWD system, the MDX is one of the better handling midsize luxury crossovers, and for 2019 the company gives us the A-Spec treatment with a new front fascia and side skirts, 20-inch wheels, wider exhaust tips, unique gauges, a new steering wheel, carbon fiber trim and various Alcantara interior touches.However, both the standard and A-Spec models get a 3.5-liter V6 engine, rated for 290 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque going through a nine-speed automatic transmission. The Acura MDX is made in East Liberty, Ohio.  Share your voice More From Roadshow 26 Photos Mercedes-Benz Vision Urbanetic Concept hits the Las Vegas Strip at CES 2019 2019 Acura MDX adds new features and an A-Spec model 2019 Jeep Cherokee can handle the rough stuff Share your voice Comments Car Industry 12 Photos More From Roadshow Jeep CherokeeKeeping its top-of-the-list placement, the Jeep Cherokee is 2019’s most American-made car. Refreshed for 2019, the compact crossover now features more tech, better cargo space and a slightly tweaked look. It’s available in no fewer the nine trims, including the off-road specific Trailhawk and a fancy-pants Trailhawk Elite.For 2019, the Cherokee gets a new 2.0-liter, turbocharged, four-cylinder engine with 270 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque, though naturally aspirated I4 and V6 choices are also available. Regardless of engine, a nine-speed automatic transmission gets the power to the pavement — or dirt as the case may be. The Cherokee is made in Belvidere, Illinois.last_img read more

Study of stalagmites in caves in China reveals 640000 years of Asian

first_imgSanbao cave (red star) is on the northern slope of Mt. Shennongjia, Hubei, central China Credit: Hai Cheng © 2016 Phys.org The annual monsoon season in Asia is a major event, bringing rains that are used to grow crops for an enormous number of people. Because of its importance, scientists would like to know more about it, such as what might happen as the planet heats up. To learn more, the researchers looked for a way to look back at what has happened in the past, and to do that, they ventured to the mountains in central China and descended into Sanbao Cave—there stalagmites have been growing up from the cave floor for hundreds of thousands of years, carrying with them, a history of the factors that led to their growth.The stalagmites grow at different rates depending on how much rain falls and leaks through the mountain above and down into the cave—during heavy rains, such as occur during monsoon seasons, layers of calcium carbonate build up, holding information about the air and rainwater at a particular point in time, which scientists can analyze to gain a good measurement of climate conditions. They can also look for dissolved uranium, which can be used to date the layers of stalagmite buildup. Together, the two sources of information can be used to create a climate timetable for past monsoon seasons, going back as far as 640,000 years—the most detailed and accurate monsoon record to date. In so doing, the researchers were also able to show that changes in solar radiation over the Northern Hemisphere were due to the planet’s precession cycle (a shift that occurs periodically in the planet’s axis of rotation)—which wound up bringing an end to the past seven ice ages. Speleothems inside of Sanbao cave (about 1500 meters from cave entrance). Credit: Hai Cheng Journal information: Nature Explore further (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from China, the U.S., Austria and Singapore has used their analysis of stalagmites in a cave deep in central China to map over 640,000 years of monsoons in Asia. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their analysis of the cave formations, what they found and how they were able to use what they learned to better understand other world events over the same time period. Nele Meckler with University of Bergen in Norway provides a more in-depth description of the work done by the team in a News & Views article in the same journal issue. Menacing monsoons More information: Hai Cheng et al. The Asian monsoon over the past 640,000 years and ice age terminations, Nature (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nature18591AbstractOxygen isotope records from Chinese caves characterize changes in both the Asian monsoon and global climate. Here, using our new speleothem data, we extend the Chinese record to cover the full uranium/thorium dating range, that is, the past 640,000 years. The record’s length and temporal precision allow us to test the idea that insolation changes caused by the Earth’s precession drove the terminations of each of the last seven ice ages as well as the millennia-long intervals of reduced monsoon rainfall associated with each of the terminations. On the basis of our record’s timing, the terminations are separated by four or five precession cycles, supporting the idea that the ‘100,000-year’ ice age cycle is an average of discrete numbers of precession cycles. Furthermore, the suborbital component of monsoon rainfall variability exhibits power in both the precession and obliquity bands, and is nearly in anti-phase with summer boreal insolation. These observations indicate that insolation, in part, sets the pace of the occurrence of millennial-scale events, including those associated with terminations and ‘unfinished terminations’. Citation: Study of stalagmites in caves in China reveals 640,000 years of Asian monsoon history (2016, June 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-06-stalagmites-caves-china-reveals-years.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more